Botanically the richest two lochs in Shetland

Our Environment

To book a site or Wigwam

Wigwams

Glamp in comfort in one of our two locally named wigwams which have electricity and basic facilities with access to kitchen, laundry and toilet facilities.

Caravans

All our pitches have electric hookups and a water supply on hard level ground with access to a kitchen, laundry and toilet facilities.

Camping

Clearly defined areas available for pitching a tent on level grass covered ground with access to a kitchen, laundry and toilet facilities.

Campervan

Motorhomes

All our pitches have electric hookups and a water supply on hard level ground with access to a kitchen, laundry and toilet facilities.

Wigwams

Caravans

Camping

Campervan

Motorhomes

A Fine Eco Balance

The lochs of Tingwall and Asta are botanically two of the richest lochs in Shetland with 9 species of pondweeds and 4 species of stonewort amongst the species recorded. They are particularly sensitive to the quality of the water around them and thus are good indicators of water quality especially in relation to nutrient pollution from nitrates and phosphates. They are an important part of the aquatic ecosystem and are a food source for wildfowl and provide shelter from predators for small invertebrates and fish. The lochs are among the most important sites in Shetland for wintering and migrant wildfowl that feed on the abundant pondweed.

The loch margin vegetation within the SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) is typical of the semi natural vegetation that would have grown on the richer soils around many of Shetland’s lochs but has been much reduced by agricultural improvements. Grazing pressure around the lochs is light and should ensure the botanical interest is maintained. There is a path around the loch (used by the Model Yacht Club) which you are welcome to use as long as you respect the habitat and avoid causing any pollution or disturbance of wildfowl.

Nature Scotland works closely with the local land owners and users to protect and maintain and enhance the features of special interest. Scalloway Caravan Park has agreed to undertake monitoring of runoff from the site in order to keep an eye on the levels of nutrient entering the loch.

Tingwall valley is an unusually green valley for Shetland as it sits on metamorphic limestone which gives rise to some of the best agricultural land in Shetland. Consequently the site is located in the middle of enclosed agricultural land used mainly for grazing of sheep and cattle and for producing silage , fodder and hay crops. Horses and ponies are also kept in nearby fields.

Wild Flowers at the Boat House at Asta and on the margins of the loch and the roadside verges 50 metres to the north and 50 metres to the south (as on 8th July 2022).

  • Marsh Marigold
  • Meadow Buttercup
  • Silverweed
  • Lesser Spearwort
  • Milk Sow-thistle
  • Dandelion
  • Marsh Ragwort
  • Common Ragwort
  • Common Bird’s-foot-trefoil
  • Yellow Iris
  • Soft Lady’s-mantle
  • Meadow Vetchling
  • Lady’s Bedstraw
  • Tormentil
  • Yellow-rattle
  • Monkeyflower
  • Common Thistle
  • Marsh Cinquefoil
  • Red Campion
  • Ragged Robin
  • Red Clover
  • Wild Thyme
  • Northern Marsh-orchid
  • Bush Vetch
  • Marsh Willowherb
  • Cuckooflower
  • Water Mint
  • Common Mouse-ear
  • Pignut
  • Hogweed
  • Ground-elder
  • Daisy
  • White Clover
  • Common Marsh-bedstraw
  • Meadowsweet
  • Eyebright
  • Germander Speedwell
  • Tufted Forget-me-not
  • Selfheal
  • Spring Squill
  • Russian Comfrey

Northern Marsh-orchid

Selfheal

White Clover

Species seen earlier in the year include:   Primrose    Bluebell   Lesser Celandine.
Species still to come:  Devil’s-bit Scabious
Heath Speedwell grows on the roadside verge just north of Asta farm but didn’t see it today.

“Really looking forward to seeing our first customers arrive and get their feedback after all the hard work that our committe has done to get our campsite to this stage.”

Sarah Kay